21 Notes

DBC: this strange and beautiful place

katherineimogene:

image

I earned these tags, and am very proud of my journey to this moment. I’ve taken a few days away to reflect - and sleep..a lot. I’m going to tell you about the worst week, and then I’m going to tell you how Dev Bootcamp has changed my life. Okay? Ok.

Here are some things about week eight of…

17 Notes

HTML-first

startupljackson:

There’s a raging debate on the twitters about whether it makes sense to build for Android vs iOS first. The real answer is that it depends on the problem you’re solving and the user’s context. But most of the time, neither is correct. Most startups should be be building for the web. In a…

This just makes sense. 

3 Notes

Join us for Rails Girls Summer of Code 2014!

railsgirls:

After an incredible first Summer of Code, we’re back for another year and need your help!

We just started our crowd funding campaign one week ago and secured 8 scholarships in 7 days! Our goal is to fund 20 scholarships for our future students again. And you can help us make that happen!…

176 Notes

What kind of Muppet are you?

nprfreshair:

Dahlia Lithwick of Slate poses this theory:

Every one of us is either a Chaos Muppet or an Order Muppet.

Read through to find out which type is which. [slightly related] Which are you?

We’ve discussed this at lengthat DBC this week. 

1 Notes

Is There Really A Skills Gap?
Excerpt from Inc. article 
“If businesses hired for skills, not experience, they could expand the pool of talent and also expand the ability of providers to get them the people they need. That is the market niche that Shereef Bishay, once a lead software developer with Microsoft, has identified.
Bishay is a founder of Dev Bootcamp, a for-profit enterprise that develops what Bishay calls “world-class beginners” in Web development and software engineering. Says Bishay, “We are a vocational school in the most honorable sense of the word.” In its first year, 2012, there were 100 graduates; in 2013, there were 370, and this year, the projection is 750. There are sites in San Francisco and Chicago; New York is scheduled next.
Bootcampers do nine weeks of intensive training (plus nine weeks of online prep before the course); working pros teach them Ruby on Rails, HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, and other skills. No specific background is required, but most participants have a college degree of some kind; the key attributes are the desire to code and what Bishay calls “a commitment to personal awareness.”
The idea is to graduate coders who not only have technical skills but whose human operating systems are also in working order. There is a 95 percent graduation rate, and essentially those graduating get jobs as soon as they want one, with an average starting salary of around $80,000; employers include Twitter, Google, and Apple.
The point is not to graduate with a degree—Bootcamp survivors get a set of dog tags on their last day rather than a diploma—but to demonstrate mastery of a particular skill. The emphasis is on extreme employability, not prestige credentialing; students bring their code to job interviews. In a sense, Dev Bootcamp is a New Agey trade school for the high-tech economy.”

Is There Really A Skills Gap?

Excerpt from Inc. article 

If businesses hired for skills, not experience, they could expand the pool of talent and also expand the ability of providers to get them the people they need. That is the market niche that Shereef Bishay, once a lead software developer with Microsoft, has identified.

Bishay is a founder of Dev Bootcamp, a for-profit enterprise that develops what Bishay calls “world-class beginners” in Web development and software engineering. Says Bishay, “We are a vocational school in the most honorable sense of the word.” In its first year, 2012, there were 100 graduates; in 2013, there were 370, and this year, the projection is 750. There are sites in San Francisco and Chicago; New York is scheduled next.

Bootcampers do nine weeks of intensive training (plus nine weeks of online prep before the course); working pros teach them Ruby on Rails, HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, and other skills. No specific background is required, but most participants have a college degree of some kind; the key attributes are the desire to code and what Bishay calls “a commitment to personal awareness.”

The idea is to graduate coders who not only have technical skills but whose human operating systems are also in working order. There is a 95 percent graduation rate, and essentially those graduating get jobs as soon as they want one, with an average starting salary of around $80,000; employers include Twitter, Google, and Apple.

The point is not to graduate with a degree—Bootcamp survivors get a set of dog tags on their last day rather than a diploma—but to demonstrate mastery of a particular skill. The emphasis is on extreme employability, not prestige credentialing; students bring their code to job interviews. In a sense, Dev Bootcamp is a New Agey trade school for the high-tech economy.”

Notes

Kevin Starr at IIT Design Research Conference 2010

This is one of my favorite talks that combines the topics of social entrepreneurship, impact investing, mission driven organizations, human centered design thinking, and data-driven results. 

In summary, here’s the list of the full chain needed to get from an initial idea or invention to real impact:

  • Idea
  • Need
  • Real Demand
  • Design Process
  • Product
  • Manufacture
  • Distribution
  • Marketing
  • Behaviour
  • Impact

Regardless of the fact that this talk primarily focuses on non-profits the logic still applies to for-profit ventures. It’s worth the watch. 

1 Notes

In Cincinnati, we’ve worked with local government to enact an open data policy, which is now in draft form as a formal motion. We’ve also collaborated with the Representatives Hagan and Duffey in Ohio to work on a bill to open data at a state level. The bill is currently being discussed by a committee at the statehouse.

Cincinnati is currently the only city in Ohio to participate as a Code for America Brigade city, the first to pass a formal policy for open data transparency, and the only city to formalize and execute a policy from a grassroots level - most other cities have an appointed CTO, Digital, or Innovation Office within city government. Ex: Jason Lally in SF, Jonathan Reichental in Palo, Dan O’Neil / Chris Whitaker in Chicago, and Mark Headd in Philly.

In our case, we are supported entirely by the Haile Foundation through a Program Manager and local technology volunteers. As such, ODC is the subject of a capstone project by graduate student researchers working for the Los Angeles City Controller’s office to help provide information and best practices useful in the construction of an open data blueprint.

- my response to a WCPO inquiry about Open Data Cincy

I’ve had my head down for so long I forgot how much we accomplished. I’m really proud and so grateful for the support. 

Open Data CincyOhio bill

Notes

Leaders Eat Last

I’m reading Leaders Eat Last, by Simon Sinek. So far, it’s proven as thought-provoking as his other publications and sparks my interest in exploring leadership development on a more in-depth level. I’m not entirely sure what that means yet. Probably reading more books. 

image

His talk at 99U last year sums up the book pretty well. Take a few minutes to watch it here:

Simon Sinek: Why Leaders Eat Last from 99U on Vimeo.

/emk 

10 Notes

radiolabreads:

Generation: The Seventeenth-Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex, Life, and Growth
Matthew Cobb
Related Podcast: Black Box

radiolabreads:

Generation: The Seventeenth-Century Scientists Who Unraveled the Secrets of Sex, Life, and Growth

Matthew Cobb

Related Podcast: Black Box

Notes

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