Notes

Bring Back Martha: The Return of the Extinct Passenger Pigeon
My grandpa used to raise and race carrier pigeons. I always thought it was a weird hobby but this story both helped me learn a few new things reinforced some basic principles: 
I genuinely had no idea that passenger pigeons were wiped out by humans. 
Science is pretty neat, you guys. 
Jurassic Park was ahead of its time. 
Old people are just cooler and know way more than young people. 
Listen to the full story here. 

Everybody loves a comeback, right? Science may be behind the craziest comeback story yet.
Once the most common vertebrate in the continent, the last captive passenger pigeon died 100 years ago. Now, a group of scientists is trying to discover a way to bring them back through a process of editing and replacing genomes.
Researchers say the passenger pigeon is an ideal candidate for de-extinction due to the large available data set of passenger pigeon tissue and DNA, as well as extensive historical records on the creature. 
Ben Novak, lead scientist for The Great Passenger Pigeon Comeback, explains why they are devoting attention to this particular animal and how the process of de-extinction works.  

Bring Back Martha: The Return of the Extinct Passenger Pigeon

My grandpa used to raise and race carrier pigeons. I always thought it was a weird hobby but this story both helped me learn a few new things reinforced some basic principles: 

  • I genuinely had no idea that passenger pigeons were wiped out by humans. 
  • Science is pretty neat, you guys. 
  • Jurassic Park was ahead of its time. 
  • Old people are just cooler and know way more than young people. 

Listen to the full story here

Everybody loves a comeback, right? Science may be behind the craziest comeback story yet.

Once the most common vertebrate in the continent, the last captive passenger pigeon died 100 years ago. Now, a group of scientists is trying to discover a way to bring them back through a process of editing and replacing genomes.

Researchers say the passenger pigeon is an ideal candidate for de-extinction due to the large available data set of passenger pigeon tissue and DNA, as well as extensive historical records on the creature. 

Ben Novak, lead scientist for The Great Passenger Pigeon Comeback, explains why they are devoting attention to this particular animal and how the process of de-extinction works.  

10 Notes

framerjs:

Card Drag with Calculated Velocity
By Jorn van Dijk
Wilson Miner posted a neat prototype to the Framer Community.

Playing with draggable.calculateVelocity() to rotate cards based on how fast you drag them around. Using Utils.modulate to map the x/y velocity to rotation values while limiting them to a maximum rotation so they don’t flip around when the velocity spikes. Pretty impressed at how responsive it is in a web view on an iPad!

See it live on the Examples Site.

framerjs:

Card Drag with Calculated Velocity

By Jorn van Dijk

Wilson Miner posted a neat prototype to the Framer Community.

Playing with draggable.calculateVelocity() to rotate cards based on how fast you drag them around. Using Utils.modulate to map the x/y velocity to rotation values while limiting them to a maximum rotation so they don’t flip around when the velocity spikes. Pretty impressed at how responsive it is in a web view on an iPad!

See it live on the Examples Site.

102 Notes

2992 Notes

Why are so many people demanding AAA titles to be all feminist and stuff when women don't even buy those games?

Asked by Anonymous

askagamedev:

The long and the short of it is… because they do. Let’s explore that thought a bit with some actual research, hm?

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Notes

Bruce Sterling - Smart City States

Brilliant talk about the future of interactive citizenship in “Smart Cities”. Echoing the essay from Dan Hill: “On the smart city; Or, a ‘manifesto’ for smart citizens instead

4 Notes

Post-Dev Bootcamp

paodev:

I’m not going to talk about what I’ve learned in DBC or my incredible experiences there. Instead, I’m going to talk about life after DBC because, really, transitioning out of DBC in to the real world (yes, you are not in the real world while at DBC) is actually a lot more difficult than…

2 Notes

Inside Dev Bootcamp New York From the Student Perspective

devbootcamp:

What if there was a school where the students graded the teachers instead of the teachers grading the students?

"I give Dev Bootcamp an A" says one student from New York, "it’s not an A+ though."

Dev Bootcamp operates in a way that most schools could only dream.

We iterate on our…

18020 Notes

amctv:

JUST RELEASED: Watch the full premiere episode of AMC’s Halt and Catch Fire NOW.

151 Notes

1953 Notes

Could you explain your story breaking process?

Asked by hayleyed

danharmon:

Start with random IDEAS.  Ideas can be anything - Poop is an idea, America, pickles, the number six, a raccoon, anything.

Some ideas will reveal related ideas, i.e. you may think, upon thinking about raccoons, that you have more than one thought about raccoons.  Clouds of related ideas that your mind recognizes as related in any way are potential story AREAS.  Look for areas that make you laugh and cry.

Draw a circle to symbolize your area, because your story will take the “reader” through related ideas in a path around a central idea.  You don’t have to know what the central idea is.  It’s probably dumb.  For God’s sake, you’re writing about raccoons.

Divide your circle into a top half and bottom half and ask yourself what those halves might be.  Like, your raccoon area might become divided into “positive thoughts about raccoons” and “negative thoughts about raccoons.”  If the division doesn’t feel charged for you, pick something else, like male raccoon thoughts and female raccoon thoughts, or biological raccoon thoughts and storybook raccoon thoughts.  At some point, you will divide your area into two parts that create a personal “charge” for you, like a battery.  ”Ooo, I like the idea that there’s a difference between biological raccoons and storybook raccoons, that tingled when I drew that line, I want to know more.” <— that’s my impression of you nailing it.

Divide the divided circle down the middle and pick another charged dichotomy for left and right.  For instance, biological/storybook raccoon area could get divided into dishonest/honest.  

Now you have four quadrants to your circle, going clockwise: biological dishonest raccoon, storybook dishonest raccoon, storybook honest raccoon, biological honest raccoon.  Any point at which you stop feeling charged, go back a step or start over.  Maybe you had to get this far to realize you don’t give a shit about raccoons.  Please note that at this point, people around you will start to express confusion and frustration, because they thought the idea was fine already.  Depending on your mood and standing, these people are called hacks, traitors, parasites, scabs or successful colleagues.

When you find an area that yields four charged quadrants, experiment with protagonists.  Easy answer first, maybe I’m a raccoon.  So once upon a time there was a dishonest biological raccoon that became a storybook raccoon, which lead to him becoming honest before finally going back to being biological again.  Cool?  If not, go back or start over.  Again, please note that many people will not want you to go back or start over.  These people will one day drown in their own blood while you point and laugh with God.  Or maybe they’re good people and you just have Asperger’s.

Then you keep dividing the pie, adding “curvature” to the protagonist’s path with the 8 point story structure you can find me blathering about elsewhere online.

Create more characters as needed, give them their own stories as needed.

Repeat every day until rich people give you money to do it for them.  Buy a house, become one of them and hire poor people to do it for you.  Somewhere in there try to get a dog and a funny girlfriend or it’s all pretty pointless.  Speaking of which, I just realized I’m the only one at the office. Thank you for this question.

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